10 Cheapest Electric Cars to Buy in 2018 (New and Used Models Compared)

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The year is now gone and it is time for an updated episode of Automotive territory with the list of the most affordable electric cars that you can buy in 2018. Probably, to the surprise of many viewers, Tesla Model 3 won’t be featured in this video.

It does have great performance specifications, but believe it or not, still remains a quite expensive car with $35,000 on the price tag. Moreover, we didn’t want to include pre-order vehicles to this list, because if you were to order a Model 3 today, best case scenario you would get one in a year or two, the waiting line is just too long and production schedule is experiencing constant delays.

So if you are shopping for an electric car in 2018, this will be your ultimate guide to learn about the reasonably priced buying options, but make sure to do some additional research on your own before making a purchase.

Cars featured in this video:

Electra Meccanica Solo: electrameccanica.com

Nowadays most urban residents drive to work by themselves. With this fact in mind, the engineers at Electra Meccanica created the Solo – the ultimate electric city car just for one passenger.

E-go Life: e-go-mobile.com/de/modelle/e.go-life

One of the most recent newcomers among small all-electric four wheelers is E-go Life. This car can accommodate two passengers, but weighs only 1800 pounds.

Renault Zoe renault.co.uk

Another car manufacturer that is rocking on the Electric cars market is Renault. Their Zoe is currently the best-selling all-electric car in Europe with the current affordable price of 19,230 dollars for the base model with signing up for the battery lease for $70 a month.

Smart Fortwo ED: smartusa.com/models/electric-pure-coupe

If you consider all of the incentives that Smart Fortwo ED qualifies for as an all-electric vehicle, you will be impressed by the rather low price of just $18,000..

Nissan Leaf 2.0: nissanusa.com/electric-cars/2018-leaf

The long awaited second generation Nissan Leaf that went on sale in January 2018 looks totally reinvented. It is somewhat bigger than the predecessor, has design features of a hot hatchback.

Ford Focus Electric: ford.com/cars/focus/models/focus-electric

The electrified Focus hardly differs from its gasoline counterpart, except for the powertrain that could make you miss the exhaust sounds and somewhat smaller cargo space that is being taken up by the 33.5 kWh battery.

Hyundai Ioniq: hyundaiusa.com/ioniq

One of the best selling all-electric cars, Hyundai Ioniq remains to be a bargain this year. With a moderate price tag, good driving range and acceleration this South Korean vehicle should be definitely considered.

Nissan Combi E-NV200: nissan.co.uk/vehicles/new-vehicles/e-nv200-combi.html

Nissan Combi E-NV200 utilizes the same technology that is already installed on thousands electric Nissans around the globe which is a 107 horsepower electric motor that is coupled with a 24 kWh battery.

Soul EV: kia.com/us/en/vehicle/soul-ev/2018

The electric version of the Kia Soul looks pretty much identical to the gasoline model, however, unlike other so-called compliance vehicles, it does not lose any space in the cargo bay to accommodate the battery.

Chevrolet Bolt: chevrolet.com/bolt-ev-electric-vehicle

Since Chevrolet Bolt is priced so close to the Model 3 and matches its capabilities, it is the perfect alternative for people who can afford the 37,000 car, but are not ready to be on the waiting list for a Tesla.

Baojun E100: media.gm.com/media/cn/en/baojun/news.html

The joint venture of General Motors, SAIC and Liuzhou Wuling Motors has released to the Chinese market a tiny and very affordable electric car Baojun E100.

Used EVs should be also considered: It has been at least five years since the first mass production electric cars from Tesla, Nissan, BMW, Ford and Chevrolet were introduced, so the auto market is now full of used offerings in good condition.

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45 Comments

  1. While I would love any of these, I am most drawn to the bolt. Unfortunately, I am not rich enough to afford two vehicles and I require a gas powered SUV to get me places no all around EV can yet get me. (6 hours from home on very rocky terrain and then 6 hours back to civilization about 4 to 6 times a month.)

  2. Reading through the comments, people concerned with range, I don't think they are being marketed as your only car, these are what you use for daily commutes to work, school, shopping, etc. when you want to visit family far away, you take gas guzzler. most of these are urban commuters, and are perfect for that purpose in my opinion.

  3. The information about the e.GO Life is not correct! There are three different models. The smallest engine has 20KW and the biggest 60KW. The battery capacity depends on the engine.

  4. The champion of low price deals is the ZEV Electric T3-1 Micro at $6300 before any subsidies, etc. OR they have a a double the range model at $7600 and a beer mug sized hybrid pack that puts the range out to over 400 miles on a liter of gas.

  5. Emission-free transportation technologies have been available for mass production for over 25 years, but without the needed infrastructure. Cars – affordable for the general public – with engines of about 1 litre fuel consumption, or cars with real water-using engines have been ready for production for over 2 decades now. These high-tech prototypes were successfully tested in countries like Canada, USA, Australia, Norway, England, Sweden, Finland, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Germany, Poland, France, Switzerland, Czech Republic, Austria, Italy, Israel, China, India, South Korea and Japan. We should already be manufacturing 35-40 million emission-free vehicles annually, and H2O engine systems should have been producing energy instead of our fossil-based and nuclear power plants. Entire technological documentations of such technologies have vanished in the EU`s Institute for Innovation and Technology, and, according to the legislation in order, it is right to be so. The expense involved in the production of such technologies is half of that of the traditional engines, they weigh about 70% less, and they can provide a huge torque. Their working range can be several thousand miles, cars could weigh 200 kg less, and their price could be 3-4000 Euros less. Segments of nearly the entire car industry secretly have the prototypes and successful tests. At the present moment we are poisoning our environment just out of mere arrogance and greed. We live in a cheap and indecent world. I firmly claim that we simply shouldn`t lie to 7 billion people, and this is only the tip of the iceberg. This information is entirely true and I hold myself accountable for its validity.

    Sincerely, Istvan Gazso, inventor

  6. Ill wait for a used Bolt. The only reason i didnt buy a Leaf or Spark EV is battery, the used batteries dont allow for the 100 mile actual range id need. Even with used batteries the Bolt should cover that with no problem. Plus 0-60 in sub 7 sec is nice.

  7. In case of a true emergency, goodbye car. True emergencies the power grid always goes down and so does cellular service. I will never own an electric car.

  8. I just bought a 2014 smart Fortwo for $5500. Last weekend, went to Samsclub with my wife, just to see what it would hold. She bought her regular weekly load, and we still had room for 3 other shopping trips.

  9. Well, I call it an iPhone effect. When new iPhone is introduced, everyone gets excited, of course, but lots of people will also hold back and wait for the S version, which has a better battery, screen, camera and so on. I know there will always be a newer and better version of all products coming to the market. The Ev revolution is in full swing and the manufacturers are starting to play catch up with each who's going to make better Ev…with longer range etc, and that's my point. I can almost guarantee, they all can make a Ev with 300-400 mile range tomorrow…. if they wanted to. Technology is there. What I'm trying to say is, Apple had the technology to make an iPhone X probably 3-4 years ago (iPhone 4s and 5 coming out) but they did not! Instead they fed us with the little upgrades over the years, just make money and I don't blame them, after all, they're business and that's their sole purpose and the same thing with cars…I'll give it 2 more years before I purchase an Ev and I really look forward to it actually.

  10. If you want to know more about the RENAULT Zoe my channel is dedicated to it. Thanks for making this video was nice to see some crazy cars like the Solo

  11. Very interesting video. Based on this, we are clearly at the tipping point for EV vs. ICE. The new Leaf looks like it has passed the tipping point. An issue that is never mentioned is the maintenance costs of EV vs. ICE. I am told, but have no data, that EV's are much less costly to maintain. Tony Saban (sp?) has videos to this effect. If  true, the Nissan Leaf is now cheaper than an equivalent ICE over the life of the vehicle. Any data on this?

  12. I am a fan of Telsa, but I'm glad you mentioned the most important fact: If you are not on the waiting list already, you probably won't get a Model 3 this year.

  13. Why is it ONLY GM gets tagged with BS like “…is often called a compliance car that General Motors had to build to meet government regulations ….and we shouldn’t care that the manufacturer might be losing money on every Bolt sold”. First, GM has done more than most any manufacturer to build and promote EV’s. I think they are currently the EV sales leader in the U.S. and will be the first to use up their 200,000 EV Federal Tax Credits. Was the Volt (1st or 2nd generation) a “compliance car”? Was the ELR a “compliance car”? Was the Spark a “compliance car”? Are the 20 new electric vehicles GM will launch by 2023 “compliance cars”? So tired of this nonsense. AND FYI *EVERY* EV maker currently loses money on “EV’s”! ….including (especially) Tesla! In fact Tesla has lost about $10 Billion dollars the past ten years buildings EV’s, and there is no sign that losing streak will end any time soon. Why didn’t you point out Tesla (or anybody else) loses money on every EV?

  14. In America we like to take long trips once a year. I will drive 400 miles to Outter Banks NC to fish. A little trailer to extend the range (Extra Batteries and Generator) I could Rent from the Dealer, Plug in, and Tow, behind the car would make it viable for me.

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